meadows

Restoring Carson Meadows- Assessment and Prioritization

Between 2014 and 2017, American Rivers was funded by NFWF to use the scorecard in the Carson River basin to guide investment and accelerate the pace of restoration. We assessed every accessible meadow in the watershed that is larger than 15 acres, 28 meadows in all. We identified six priority meadows and established a Carson meadows work group to pursue restoration of these six sites.
Report

Restoring Walker Meadows: Assessment and Prioritization

Between 2013 and 2015, American Rivers and Trout Unlimited were funded by NFWF to use the meadow scorecard in the Walker basin to guide investment and accelerate the pace of restoration. We identified five priority meadows and established the Walker Working Group to pursue restoration of these five sites. The purpose of this Walker Basin Meadows Condition Report is twofold. First, it provides condition data and explains why the Walker Working Group chose the first set of meadows as the top priority for restoration. Second, the working group will use information presented here to plan subsequent restoration efforts once the first group of meadows is restored.
Report

Assessment and Prioritization of Meadows in the Golden Trout Wilderness

Meadows of the Golden Trout Wilderness (GTW) are an extremely valuable component of the landscape, providing numerous benefits to society. In 2012, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation funded a partnership between CalTrout, Trout Unlimited, and American Rivers to evaluate meadow resources in the GTW and prioritize meadows for restoration. We hope the information we provide here will help partners and the US Forest Service work together to increase the pace and scale of meadow restoration in the GTW.
Report

Pine Creek Meadow Assessment

This report shares the results of a broadly collaborative effort to assess and prioritize meadows in the Pine Creek Basin for restoration. The purpose of this Pine Creek Meadow Assessment report is twofold. First, it provides condition data and explains why the Pine Creek CRMP chose the first set of meadows as the top priority for restoration. Second, it provides a basis and identifies next steps for partners to pursue in restoring meadows in the watershed.
Report

Sierra Nevada Multi-source Meadow Polygons Compilation v.2

Resource Type: 
Summary: 
Compiled meadows polygons for the Sierra Nevada of California containing 18,780 meadow polygons (total area = 112,567 hectares, 278,160 acres)

 

Format:
ESRI ArcGIS 10 File Geodatabase

Citations:

UC Davis, Center for Watershed Sciences & USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, 2017. Sierra Nevada Multi-Source Meadow Polygons Compilation (v 2.0), Vallejo, CA, Regional Office: USDA Forest Service.2017. http://meadows.ucdavis.edu/

Weixelman, D. A., B. Hill, D.J. Cooper, E.L. Berlow, J. H. Viers, S.E. Purdy, A.G. Merrill, and S.E. Gross. 2011. Meadow Hydrogeomorphic Types for the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascade Ranges in California: A Field Key. Gen. Tech. Rep. R5-TP-034. Vallejo, CA. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, 34 pp.

Acknowledgements:

Tim Lindemann, Dave Weixelman, Carol Clark, Stacey Mikulovsky, Qiqi Jiang, Joel Grapentine, Kirk Evans - USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region
Wes Kitlasten - U.S. Geological Survey
Sarah Yarnell, Ryan Peek, Nick Santos - UC Davis, Center for Watershed Sciences
Anna Fryjoff-Hung - UC Merced

Contact info :

Ryan Peek
rapeek@ucdavis.edu

Access and use limitations

This is an unofficial dataset compiled from the best available sources. The University of California, Davis (UCD) & USDA Forest Service (USFS) make no representations or warranties regarding the accuracy of data or maps. The user will not seek to hold UCD nor USFS liable under any circumstances for any damages with respect to any claim by the user or any third party on account of or arising from the use of data or maps. The user will cite UCD & USFS as the original source of the data, but will clearly denote cases where the original data have been updated, modified, or in any way altered from the original condition. There are no restrictions on distribution of the data by users.

Description

Brief Methods:

In version 2 of the Sierra Nevada Multi-source Meadow Polygons Compilation, polygon boundaries from the original layer (SNMMPC_v1 - https://meadows.ucdavis.edu/data/4) were updated using ‘heads-up’ digitization from high-resolution (1m) NAIP imagery. In version 1, only polygons larger than one acre were retained in the published layer. In version 2, existing polygon boundaries were split, reduced in size, or merged, and additional polygons not captured in the original layer were digitized. If split, original IDs from version 1 were retained for one half and a new ID was created for the other half. In instances where adjacent meadows were merged together, only one ID was retained and the unused ID was “decommissioned”. If digitized, a new sequential ID was assigned.

 

Montane Meadows in the Sierra Nevada: Changing Hydroclimatic Conditions and Concepts for Vulnerability Assessment

The Center for Watershed Sciences authored a technical report, "Montane Meadows in the Sierra Nevada: Changing Hydroclimatic Conditions and Concepts for Vulnerability Assessment" to better prepare the meadows community for ecosystem monitoring and restoration planning under future hydroclimatic conditions.
Report

Sierra Nevada Multi-source Meadow Polygons Compilation v.1

Resource Type: 
Summary: 
Compiled meadows layer for the Sierra Nevada containing 17,039 meadow polygons (total area = 77,659 hectares, 191,900 acres).

Format:
ESRI ArcGIS 10 File Geodatabase

Citation:
Fryjoff-Hung & Viers, 2012. Sierra Nevada Multi-Source Meadow Polygons Compilation (v 1.0), Center for Watershed Sciences, UC Davis. December 2012. http://meadows.ucdavis.edu/

Contact info:
Joshua Viers
jhviers@ucdavis.edu

Methods

UC Davis compiled the “best available” meadow polygon layers into a single data layer. Data layers were collected from various agencies, individuals, and organizations. Data layer quality varied based on compilation methods and age; some layers were excluded due to poor data quality. A confidence rank (1 = low, 10 = high) was assigned to the remaining layers which were rasterized at a 10 m resolution. The layers were combined and combined raster cells with a summed rank of 2 or less were excluded. Raster cells representing open water were also excluded. A majority filter was run on the resulting remaining cells to reduce boundary heterogeneity, which replaced cell values based on the majority of the eight neighboring cells. Individual meadow polygons were created through a raster to vector conversion that treated all contiguous cells as a single part meadow feature with boundaries smoothed using the Polynomial Approximation with Exponential Kernel (PAEK) method (20 m tolerance to reduce edge complexity). Polygons with an area less than 0.4 ha (< 1 acre) were removed from the final meadow composite. Original IDs and other attributes were attached to the meadow polygons.

Due to the proprietary nature of some of the original data, and spatial imprecision, this method was used to homogenize the output of the compilation process. Original source identifiers have been maintained to migrate data between providers.

These data represent the most comprehensive spatial data on mountain meadows for the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascades. However, they are based on other available data, thus omissions are possible.

Please see the attached metadata file for more information.