Reports

Posted: February 5, 2014
This reports describes Central Sierra Environmental Resource Center (CSERC) continued monitoring of meadow condition and the degree of grazing utilization at more than 30 mountain meadows on the Stanislaus National Forest.

Posted: February 5, 2014
This reports describes Central Sierra Environmental Resource Center (CSERC) continued monitoring or meadow condition and the degree of grazing utilization at more than 60 mountain meadows on the Stanislaus National Forest.

Posted: November 2, 2016
The Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) is a California Endangered Species, with an estimated population size of only 100-200 pairs in the state. It is the largest owl in North America and one of the largest owls in the world. It is also one of the most reclusive bird species, which provides challenges in studying its life history.

Posted: February 12, 2015
This report brings together recent survey results from state and federal agencies and other groups, and provide an updated range map and population estimate for Willow Flycatcher in the Sierra Nevada.

Posted: February 11, 2014
The Institute for Bird Populations is teaming with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and numerous public and private land managers to develop, assess, and refine bird-friendly meadow restoration efforts. This report is provides information relating to the development of a monitoring protocol for assessing how bird populations respond to meadow restoration in the Sierra Nevada. Monitoring visits included point count surveys, area searches, and vegetation assessments. This report describes results of the pre- and post-restoration monitoring completed at 59 meadows (including restoration and reference meadows) during 2012.

Posted: November 15, 2017
Meadows of the Golden Trout Wilderness (GTW) are an extremely valuable component of the landscape, providing numerous benefits to society. In 2012, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation funded a partnership between CalTrout, Trout Unlimited, and American Rivers to evaluate meadow resources in the GTW and prioritize meadows for restoration. We hope the information we provide here will help partners and the US Forest Service work together to increase the pace and scale of meadow restoration in the GTW.

Posted: February 8, 2017
A USGS comprehensive national assessment of carbon (C) storage and flux (flow) and the fuxes of other greenhouse gases (GHGs, including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O)). These carbon and GHG variables were examined in the Western United States for major terrestrial ecosystems (forests, grasslands/shrublands, agricultural lands, and wetlands) and aquatic ecosystems (rivers, streams, lakes, estuaries, and coastal waters) in two time periods: baseline (the first half of the 2000s) and future (projections from baseline to 2050).

Posted: April 16, 2015
In this project, we sought to identify putative climate change refugia and connectivity between meadows across the Sierra Nevada and to use data on persistence, stability, and genetic diversity of mammal populations to validate these hypotheses. We addressed California Landscape Conservation Cooperative priorities of scale by analyzing across the Sierra Nevada. We involved state and federal natural resource managers throughout the project; some are already beginning to incorporate results. Our products focused on maps and tools that are user-friendly and that allow managers to make decisions and set landscape conservation priorities. We are communicating project outcomes directly to CA LCC partners to aid in decisions from immediate, small-scale adaptation projects to region-wide changes in use, development, and planning for state and federal land management. Our results will help managers to prioritize areas and landscapes that are critical to maintaining biodiversity in the Sierra Nevada in the face of climate change and to focus limited resources for effective adaptation efforts.

Posted: November 15, 2017
This report briefly describes the methods we developed and presents findings from applying the methods in the Yuba and Mokelumne River watersheds.The methods we developed and the on-the-ground data for the Yuba and Mokelumne watersheds supply a replicable template that may be applied in other watersheds to focus meadow restoration effort where it will provide the greatest value. The prioritized list of meadows we developed galvanized support of the top restoration candidate (see From Prioritization to Restoration, below) and, within six months, resulted in completed permits and three funding proposals.Our ultimate goal is to accelerate and improve meadow restoration. The steps we took in this project focus on providing the infrastructure necessary for meadow restoration to gain and sustain momentum into its next phase, where watershed-scale impacts are anticipated.

Posted: February 18, 2016
Natural Range of Variation (NRV) assessments (essentially equivalent to Historical Range of Variation [HRV] assessments) provide baseline information on ecosystem conditions (composition, structure, and function) that can be compared to current conditions to develop an idea of trend over time and an idea of the level of departure of altered ecosystems from their “natural” state (Morgan et al. 1984, Manley et al. 1995, Landres et al. 1999, Wiens et al. 2012; see Methods). These trend assessments form part of the basis for the assessment of ecological integrity that is required in the 2012 Forest Service Planning Rule. NRV assessments were carried out for 11 terrestrial ecosystems by the Pacific Southwest Region Ecology Program between October, 2012 and May, 2013, using historical information (primarily from the pre-Euroamerican period, 16th century to the mid-19th century) as well as information from modern-day reference ecosystems and other sources. This is the meadow NRV assessment.

Posted: February 10, 2014
The Center for Watershed Sciences authored a technical report, "Montane Meadows in the Sierra Nevada: Changing Hydroclimatic Conditions and Concepts for Vulnerability Assessment" to better prepare the meadows community for ecosystem monitoring and restoration planning under future hydroclimatic conditions.

Posted: November 15, 2017
This report shares the results of a broadly collaborative effort to assess and prioritize meadows in the Pine Creek Basin for restoration. The purpose of this Pine Creek Meadow Assessment report is twofold. First, it provides condition data and explains why the Pine Creek CRMP chose the first set of meadows as the top priority for restoration. Second, it provides a basis and identifies next steps for partners to pursue in restoring meadows in the watershed.

Posted: March 7, 2018
Between 2014 and 2017, American Rivers was funded by NFWF to use the scorecard in the Carson River basin to guide investment and accelerate the pace of restoration. We assessed every accessible meadow in the watershed that is larger than 15 acres, 28 meadows in all. We identified six priority meadows and established a Carson meadows work group to pursue restoration of these six sites.

Posted: March 7, 2018
Between 2014 and 2017, American Rivers was funded by NFWF to use the meadow scorecard in the Middle Truckee River Basin to focus investment and accelerate the pace of restoration. We assessed every accessible meadow in the watershed that is larger than 15 acres, 30 in all. We prioritized these meadows for restoration with a working group comprised of local stakeholders who are actively and strategically pursing restoration in the watershed. We identified 6 priority meadows in the Middle Truckee River watershed.

Posted: November 15, 2017
Between 2013 and 2015, American Rivers and Trout Unlimited were funded by NFWF to use the meadow scorecard in the Walker basin to guide investment and accelerate the pace of restoration. We identified five priority meadows and established the Walker Working Group to pursue restoration of these five sites. The purpose of this Walker Basin Meadows Condition Report is twofold. First, it provides condition data and explains why the Walker Working Group chose the first set of meadows as the top priority for restoration. Second, the working group will use information presented here to plan subsequent restoration efforts once the first group of meadows is restored.

Posted: January 18, 2017
A new strategy summary report has been released highlighting approaches to restoring and/or protecting 30,000 meadow acres on all lands in the Sierra Nevada.

Posted: January 18, 2017
All-hands, all-lands approach to increasing the pace, scale, and efficacy of meadow restoration and protection throughout the Greater Sierra Nevada. Articulates three overarching strategy approaches, 1) Restore and/or protect meadows to achieve desired conditions; 2) Enhance regulatory and institutional funding capacity and coordination; 3) Increase and diversify institutional and partnership capacity for meadow restoration and/or protection in the greater Sierra.

Posted: October 1, 2010
Hemmert, Jennifer E. And Joshua H. Viers. 2010. Sierra Nevada Meadow Hydrology Assessment: 2010 Field Assessment. An Interim Project Report to the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region (USFS PSW). University of California, Davis. 120 ppd.

Posted: November 1, 2011
Jensen, Nicholas J. And Joshua H. Viers. 2011. Sierra Nevada Meadow Hydrology Assessment: 2011 Field Assessment. An Interim Project Report to the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region (USFS PSW). University of California, Davis. 674 ppd.

Posted: October 1, 2012
Fryjoff-Hung, Anna and Joshua H. Viers. 2012. Sierra Nevada Meadow Hydrology Assessment: 2012 Field Assessment. An Interim Project Report to the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region (USFS PSW). University of California, Davis. 296 ppd.

Posted: September 12, 2012
Fryjoff-Hung, Anna and Joshua H. Viers. 2012. Sierra Nevada Meadow Hydrology Assessment: Additional Meadows. University of California, Davis. 43 ppd.

Posted: February 1, 2013
Fryjoff-Hung, Anna and Joshua H. Viers. 2013. Sierra Nevada Meadow Hydrology Assessment. Final Project Report to the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region (USFS PSW). University of California, Davis. 1114 ppd.